Preventing Health Problems for Caregivers

When discussing the well being of caregivers, the most common topic is stress relief and mental health. This is because being a caregiver can often be a stressful position that can affect the mental health of the person. Although this is a huge concern for the well being of caregivers, there are also physical ailments and sicknesses that can affect caregivers more so than the average person. It is important to look at any possible or common sicknesses, ailments or injuries that could affect a caregiver and use techniques to prevent any of them from manifesting.

Back Problems

Many caregivers are often required to do a lot of lifting, which can cause back problems. Many seniors require help being lifted or just general support in their daily life. It is important for caregivers to lift properly to avoid injuring their backs. Important tips when lifting are to lift with your legs and not your back, ensure that you are standing in a stable position and make sure that you don’t have locked knees. It can also help to try to distribute weight evenly, especially when moving the senior sideways. Bending forward can further injure your back or strain your neck.

 Catching Common Sickness

When you are a caregiver, you are in charge of the well being of a person who is much more susceptible to sickness than you are. This makes it much easier for you to catch sicknesses because you are in such close contact with them. Making sure to wash your hands often can help as well as avoiding touching your face or eating if you haven’t washed your hands. Its also important to make sure you get lots of sleep and eat a well-balanced diet.

 Care for Yourself as Well

One of the most important aspects of being a caregiver is ensuring that you also care for yourself. If you are sick or injured, it affects your ability to provide the essential care to your client or family member. In caring for yourself, you are making sure that those that rely on you will be able to continue to do so. Caring for yourself can include eating well and exercising. This will keep you strength up and also will keep you feeling well and able. Another way to keep yourself healthy is to go see your doctor often for checkups. Since you are caring for a person who is much more vulnerable than you are, it is important that you don’t pass along any sicknesses that could be a huge detriment to their health.

Should Your Parent Move in with You?

There are many benefits to having your elderly parent move in with you including being able to keep a closer eye on their well-being as well as being able to spend more time with them. Although there can be a lot of benefits to your parents living with you, it is an extremely large decision with many factors to consider. The emotional and physical needs of your parent should be considered along with the expense, and physical and emotional toll that living together will take on you. If you decide to have your parent move in with you, it is important for you to realize the scope of what is required of their care and how you will best meet any care requirements.

Are You Able to Provide the Necessary Care?

Not everyone is capable of becoming a caregiver and it is important to realize what sort of care your parent needs and if you are willing and able to provide it. If your parent has either a medical or mental health illness that requires the attention of someone who has medical training, becoming your parent’s caregiver does not necessarily make sense. Whereas, if your parent has minimal health issues and is still independent in most ways, the care required will also be minimum and you will be able to spend more time as a family in general, but still have your own space.

Can Your Home Accommodate Your Parent?

Many seniors have mobility issues and your home may not be modified in an accessible way. If this is the case, it may be a large expense fitting your home to include your parent. For seniors who are unable to climb stairs, a main level bedroom and bathroom will be required. This can mean costly renovations and also a significant decrease in common space within your home. Issues of privacy must also be considered to ensure that both you and any other family members as well as your parent feel that they have personal space.

Do You Get Along?

Many parent/child relationships can be strained and it is important to ask yourself whether you and your parent get along. Do you fight a lot, or have you always been on the same page? Although conflict can be normal, it is imperative that before moving your parent in with you that you evaluate your past relationship. Living together and acting as your parent’s caregiver will be a high stress situation and if you already have relationship problems, they are likely to be exacerbated when you live in close quarters.

The Rest of the Household

Although both your and your parent’s opinions on a potential move-in situation are key, it is also important to find out how the rest of the people within the household will be affected. Evaluate the relationships that your spouse or children have with your parent and make sure that this move-in is a good fit for everyone. Encourage your family to be open about their feelings to ensure that everyone feels their opinion is respected.

Activities for Seniors with Visual Impairments

For many people, ensuring that those seniors with visual impairments aren’t bored and have plenty to do is extremely important. Not only is this an issue in assisted living facilities and senior homes, but also for seniors living at home. Activities, games and events should be accessible to those with visual impairments because it is generally not too much trouble to adapt them to include aids for people who don’t have the best sight. The inclusion of adaptations to these activities can make a huge difference in the life of a senior with visual impairment who may often face isolation or boredom as they are unable to contribute or participate with others who are able to see.

Adaptability

There are many ways to adapt activities to assist visually impaired seniors and keep them included in their surroundings. Whether this involves using large print (such as large print edition books) which allows seniors to be able to read books they would have otherwise have been unable to read due to the small size of the text, or involving more audio so they are able to use their ears instead of their eyes to participate. Another option for a lot of seniors who are visually impaired is to play games, or participate in activities with the assistance of another person who does not have any visual impairments. This way, that person will be able to explain and assist the visually impaired senior in participation. This is important to prevent isolation, boredom and the ability to be involved in a group activity.

Cards and Board Games

Cards and board games are some of the easiest things to adapt for visually impaired seniors. This is because they mostly rely on physical game pieces that must be read or seen. These types of games don’t usually require any abstract description, so they are easy for visually impaired seniors to learn and understand. To help these seniors, trying using large print cards, or those that have raised numbers. This way seniors will be able to play the game without needing someone else to read the card over their shoulders to tell them what cards they have. The same can be done with board games. Many companies sell adapted versions of their games. For instance, dominoes has an adaptive version with raised black dots on the tile. This means that visually impaired seniors can feel which numbers are on the tile for themselves without struggling to see the numbers.

Shows and Events

Many shows and events now include audio description intended for the visually impaired. Audio description is often available at art and history museums and theatres. Options at live plays are available as well as movie theatres which try to have described video in the same way that television does for the most popular shows.

Although it can seem difficult to a senior who is visually impaired to participate with friends and family in certain activities, it is important that they feel included. Having these activities adapted for inclusion of the visually impaired can make a massive difference in a senior’s quality of life.